Buying a New Car
Kerrie Kerrie Jan 22 in Motor Tags: Car Buying Advice Motor New Car

6 Tips When Buying A New Car

 

Car shopping can be both exciting and an absolute nightmare. So, if you’re upgrading to a brand new car, we have some tips to help you secure the best deal.

 

  1. Identify the models that hold their value

One of the biggest concerns when buying a new car is how quickly it could potentially lose its value. It’s not surprising that the amount your car decreases in value throughout the years is typically the largest cost and should be taken into consideration. When you create your shortlist of cars, it’s a good idea to search through older models of that car on DoneDeal to give you an idea of the price you expect your car to be worth in a couple of years time.

 

  1. Estimate running costs

Make sure you have an indication of the running costs of the car you intend to purchase. This will mean no nasty surprises down the line. Consider all or some of the below:

  1. Purchase price of the car
  2. Potential finance repayments
  3. Fuel cost (you can read more about petrol versus diesel cars here)
  4. Motor tax
  5. Car insurance
  6. Servicing

 

  1. Haggle

Haggling can be daunting, especially if you’re dealing with a seasoned car salesperson. If you’re new to the world of negotiation, an easy starting point is to ask the salesperson to include something for free with the sale. Whether that’s a sat-nav or a roof rack, if you need an add-on try not to pay extra for it. Another great way to leverage your buying power is to visit a number of car dealerships. In doing so, you’re armed with deals from a variety of dealerships meaning that the salesperson will have to make you a better offer if they want to secure the sale. Finally, walking away from a purchase if you’re not happy with the deal can show the salesperson that you’re not super keen and are happy to hold-off for a better offer – another tactic which is likely to lead to a better deal.

 

  1. Ensure those extras are needed

Make sure that any extras that you buy are needed – and most importantly worth the money. It’s very easy to get swept away in the heat of the sale and the novelty of a new car and add some features such as sat nav or cruise control when you’re purchasing a new car. All of these extras will certainly bump up the cost so you should be sure that you really need them. And if so, can you get them cheaper elsewhere? To avoid adding unnecessary extras which increase the purchase price, it helps to create a list of all of the features that you’d like your new car to include. Ideally, this list should be prioritised so that you can add the most important extras first and still stay within your budget.

 

  1. Choose the correct finance

Often when you’re buying a big ticket item like a new car, you will need help to finance the purchase. While it’s important to visit a number of dealerships to get the best car deal, it’s also important to shop around for the best finance offer. Car finance is on every salesperson’s lips right now, it’s likely that PCP or HP finance will be offered to you when purchasing a new car. Before you commit, make sure you are fully informed about the pros and cons of both PCP and HP finance so that you can make the best decision for you. Also consider a car loan from your local credit union or bank. Don’t be overwhelmed when the salesperson begins to talk finance. Ask as many questions as you need and take any calculations home with you to look over – choosing a finance type for your new car is a big decision and should not be taken lightly.

 

  1. Test drive

Although this seems obvious, this step of the new car buying journey can often be forgotten. The car may appear perfect to you on paper but once you take it for a test drive you may not be convinced that it’s the right car for you. Check out our top tips for test driving a new car here.

 

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